YOU KNOW YOU'RE FROM SPOKANE

What sets Spokane apart from the rest? Post here or on our facebook page how you know you're from Spokane and we will put it on our website!


 

 




... you are not the least suspicious of a middle aged women wearing a "Cougars" sweatshirt.

... you pass two cars on the way into town and wonder where in the world everyone is going today.

... you know what the sun looks like.

... you don't think twice about driving an hour or so to see friends, or go shopping.

... you learned how to drive the farm equipment before you did the family car.

... you know what it means to have to go move water.

... you're surprised that the map says the road by your house is a "primitive" road. It's like a real road...

... you're late getting the kids to school because the neighbor was moving his cattle...and the principal already knows it.

... people back east ask you if you aren't tired of the rain.

... you watch Northwest Cable News and feel sorry for anyone living on the west side.

... You look in your rear view mirror and there is actually space between you and the car that is following you.

... You rarely have to "get away from it all"... because you usually are away from it all.

... Your commute time is easy to figure out. "I live about 30 miles from work, that should take me about 30 minutes to get there."

... A drive by is committed with a squirt gun or something that was a result of a hunting accident.

... Our gangs or hoodlums are deer.

... Speed limits are subjective especially during harvest (where 55 becomes 25).

... You know that when your Hispanic neighbors tell you they are from "down South" they do not mean California or Florida.

... Lentils are an ingredient in cookies.

... You learned to drive by age ten. You also learned to shoot the 22. By age twelve, you can do both at once.

... A grain elevator, ten people and, one mule make a town!

... You know the "primitive" roads better than the highways.

... It is pronounced, "Warsh'ing'ton", "SpO' Can", "Lew'A'ston", "Wash'Tuck'Na", and "***'a'Ma". The state next to us is "I'Da'Ho"

... You learn that you can cross pollinate spaghetti squash with honeydew melon the hard way.

... The banana belt ends with that invisible line at Rosalia where not only can you smell Spokane but, you begin to experience their weather.

... "Exotic" pet is also subjective.

... You are not confused when you see an "open range" sign and it applies to elk, emu, llamas and cattle. Nor are you confused when you see Zebra in a fenced pasture.

... "Big city life" refers to Pullman, Lewiston/Clarkston, or Walla Walla.

... You care less about the stock market than you do the moisture content in your wheat.

... You go to the post office or grocery to get the town gossip over the cup of coffee your brought in.

... You would never be caught dead buying an onion from Idaho.

... You spend more on vet bills than your own health care.

... Your first car cost you $100.

... You drive to Garfield to have breakfast.

... You understand the term "toll call" still applies even if your only calling across town.

... You knew twenty years ago Washington had some of the best wines in the world.

... You can spot an "outsider" because they do not wave at everyone they see.

... When the town police officer addresses you by first name, it is a good thing!

... You have a separate budget for cheese, chocolate, coffee and wine. These are necessity items.

... You are not concerned about how radio active granite countertops may be.

... You find the bumper sticker, "I support small business",to be redundant.

... You know where "Moo-U" and "E -Woo" are.

... You frequently shop in Idaho to get great gas prices.

... You do not go to the Indian Reservations to gamble.

... Herbal medicine has a different implication for you.  

... When you say you need to go mend fences, you are not talking about interpersonal relationships.

... You find yourself saying more often than not, "You just don’t get it!".

... When you travel to Europe - they think you are Canadian. You simply reply with, "aye"